Nordic Walking and Osteoporosis

April 4, 2018 | By Urban Poling

Share Button

Osteoporosis Canada predicts that by the year 2020, 50% of people aged 50 and over will be at risk of bone fracture. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by bone tissue deterioration and low bone mass, which increases the chances of bone fracture and although it may have prevented Bonnie Lindsay from running, it did not stop her from walking. Bonnie is a personal fitness trainer and certified Nordic Walking instructor who attributes walking with Urban poles as an essential part of her recovery after undergoing bilateral knee and hip replacements.
According to Osteoporosis Canada,
“Exercise is an important step towards protecting your bones, as it helps protect your spine, slows the rate of bone loss, and builds muscle strength, which can prevent falls.” Even though we may not all be able to jump, climb or play soccer any longer, we can still engage in some form of physical activity, so why not walk? Bonnie encourages exercises that promote good posture, core strengthening and are “spine-sparing”. To put it in Bonnie’s words, “Watch your posture, stand up straight, carry your head level and right over your spine.” Walking with Urban Poles helps you do just that!

Be sure to read all about Bonnie’s inspiring story: https://www.pressreader.com/canada/ottawa-citizen/20180326/282398399962513

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share Button

Urban Poling

Co-directors Mandy Shintani and Diana Oliver are women at different stages of life with very different professional backgrounds, yet they share a dream – to help others realize the many benefits Urban Poling has given to them.
You might be interested in the following items! Other people who read this article were also interested in:
Provide variety in your routine, try double poling

Use the standard rhythm and technique, but swing both arms forward at the same time planting the boot tips slightly behind the handles. Then, keeping your arms straight, press down on the base of the handles, walk between your poles and feel your arms extend past your thighs and behind your body.
Barb Gormley, Director of Education

Tips from the Best